Table 3.

Hemoglobin, GFR quintiles, and CHD-related deathsa

Quintiles of Hemoglobin and GFRbCHD-Related Deaths
No. at RiskNo. of CHD-Related DeathsRatecAge- and Gender-Adjusted HR (95% CI)dMultivariate-Adjusted HR (95% CI)d
All participants, lowest quintile of
    neither2033824.7ReferenceReference
    hemoglobin only434174.70.90 (0.54 to 1.53)0.95 (0.56 to 1.62)
    GFR only4317423.71.39 (0.94 to 2.06)1.33 (0.89 to 1.99)
    both hemoglobin and GFR1765145.32.32 (1.51 to 3.57)2.07 (1.33 to 3.22)
Women, lowest quintile of
    neither1130262.6ReferenceReference
    hemoglobin only272114.71.37 (0.67 to 2.81)1.26 (0.61 to 2.61)
    GFR only2523820.21.49 (0.80 to 2.76)1.23 (0.64 to 2.35)
    both hemoglobin and GFR922540.82.34 (1.18 to 4.65)1.82 (0.88 to 3.78)
Men, lowest quintile of
    neither903567.4ReferenceReference
    hemoglobin only16264.60.57 (0.25 to 1.32)0.68 (0.29 to 1.59)
    GFR only1793629.01.33 (0.80 to 2.24)1.51 (0.88 to 2.59)
    both hemoglobin and GFR842650.72.20 (1.24 to 3.89)2.32 (1.29 to 4.17)
  • a HR, hazard risk ratio.

  • b GFR as estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation.

  • c Rate per 1000 person-years of follow-up.

  • d Cox regression model adjusted for age, gender, pre-existing CHD, smoking status, alcohol consumption, mean arterial BP, total serum cholesterol, fibrinogen, body mass index, diabetes, and self-reported health.